The Nature of Art and the Art of Nature at Blackwell Arts and Crafts House

A recent trip to the Lake District afforded the opportunity to visit Blackwell, an outstanding example of Arts and Crafts design, and to reflect on the interplay between nature and human endeavour in the design world. The Arts and Crafts movement in the 1880s-1920s promoted real craftsmanship in the face of an increasingly mechanised world. It [...]

A Room with a Theme at Osborne House

Everyone knows the impact a themed room can have in a house. When done right it can define and distinguish a space, set it apart and leave a lasting impression.This fact was not lost on Queen Victoria, who created an incredible Indian-themed banqueting hall in her seaside retreat Osborne house. Set in a picturesque coastal [...]

Getting Some Perspective

A holiday is always an opportunity to step back, see things from a new angle and get some perspective; but not often in so literal a sense as on a recent trip to Rome. A few steps through a church door (one of the many, many such doors you pass in the endlessly rewarding streets [...]

The Architecture of Protest at the V&A’s ‘Disobedient Objects’

I visited the V&A ‘Disobedient Objects‘ on its last, oversubscribed last day at the beginning of this month, expecting to see plenty of makeshift gas masks, defaced walls and posters shouting righteous slogans. All of the above was in plentiful supply, but the real highlight of the exhibition for me was the unexpected role which architecture [...]

Showcase: Architect@Work, Kensington Olympia

Last week we visited the Architect@Work exhibition in Kensington Olympia, which showcased some of the most recent innovations in the industry. Here are 5 of our favourites: Sensory Sky by Dornbracht The exhibit most hotly anticipated by the Boundary Space team, Dornbracht’s Sensory Sky rain shower aims to “stimulate all the senses”. Inspired by natural [...]

Inside View: Lloyds of London

Last week Boundary Space gained access to one of the most famous City buildings, a skyscraper whose towering status has endured since its unveiling, despite the fact that it has long been overtaken in physical stature by its peers. Lloyds of London in its current manifestation was built in 1986 and confirmed architect Richard Rogers’ [...]

Review: Anarchy and Beauty: William Morris and his Legacy, at the National Portrait Gallery, London

This week I visited the National Portrait Gallery’s William Morris spectacular: Anarchy and Beauty: William Morris and his Legacy.  The exhibition successfully displays Morris’s own unique and extensive talents (textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, social activist, Pre-Raphaelite associate, publisher), whilst equally revealing how he informed and inspired the artistic practices of successive generations and of [...]

Where Architecture and Photography Collide: ‘Constructing Worlds’ at the Barbican, London

The Foreward to the accompanying catalogue for the Barbican‘s exhibition Constructing Worlds: Photography and Architecture in the Modern World states that architecture is “the most significant, undeniable and often monumental and enduring trace of our presence on this planet”. In some ways the exhibition, which admirably demonstrates this statement to be true, can be seen [...]

The Typography of Paris

There is not too much to say about this. At Boundary space we are pretty big Francophiles and we also love graphics and typography, especially on buildings, so from our recent trips here is a small collection. Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook Share on Linkedin share via Reddit Share with Stumblers [...]

Art Nouveau in Brussels

  In the land of beer, chocolate and waffles, on a recent (purely cultural!) long weekend, I made a visit to the wonderful Musée Horta – the home and studio of prominent Art Nouveau designer and architect Victor Horta. The whole building is meticulously designed and crafted, inside and out, by Horta; from the centrepiece of [...]